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Resources for Parents Who Seldom Read

Posted in General, Jane Kise, Kidtelligent, Web Connections on February 25th, 2013 by kidtelligent@gmail.com – Be the first to comment

girl reading bookWhile it’s possible to raise a swimmer if you hate the water, and a pitcher if you can’t throw straight, the easiest way to raise readers is by reading yourself. While it might be hard to find time, might I suggest that if you found the right book, little would stand in the way of your finishing it? And if your children see you squeezing in time to get back to a great book, might they also see books as worthy of their time? Here are some great ways to find titles

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Read, Read, Read

Posted in General, Jane Kise, Kidtelligent, Web Connections on February 6th, 2013 by kidtelligent@gmail.com – 2 Comments

girl-readingIf your child is in grades K-6 and the teacher is worried about whether his or her reading skills are at grade level, remember these three rules:

  •  Don’t Panic
  •  Always Carry a Book (preferably two)

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Advice for Introverted Parents Raising Extroverted Children

Posted in General, Guest Mom, Kidtelligent, Mothers Perspective, Web Connections on February 1st, 2013 by kidtelligent@gmail.com – Be the first to comment

friends-in-huddleEven with all of its rewards and joys, parenting can also be incredibly draining – especially for those parents who tend toward introversion with a child whose interaction needs far exceed your own.  So how do you best parent when your child craves and recharges from interaction as much as you crave and recharge from solitude?  R.L. LaFever’s post “Tips for Introverted Parents Raising Extroverted Kids” is an article I’ve re-read and referred to several since I am the mother of at least one extroverted son and the wife to a very extroverted husband.

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Some Dos and Don’ts for Raising Your Quiet, Reserved Child

Posted in General, Guest Mom, Kidtelligent, Mothers Perspective, Web Connections on January 17th, 2013 by kidtelligent@gmail.com – Be the first to comment

boy-intense-studyingIn this chatty, busy, extroverted world, those of us who are more reserved may feel at times as though we have a personality malfunction.  For a child who tends more toward introversion, trying to fit in to our bustling society may lend to them feeling a lack of confidence and sense of belonging.  In the blog post “5 Things to Know About Raising Introverted Children,” author Kelly Bartlett shares some ideas that parents can use to better suit their more quiet child’s needs:

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Being Your Child’s Confidant

Posted in General, Guest Mom, Mothers Perspective, Web Connections on January 11th, 2013 by kidtelligent@gmail.com – Be the first to comment

Baseball Boy and Dad/Coach 2Recently I’ve heard a couple of my friends with teenage children say things like “As long as I don’t hear about it…” or “I just don’t want to know” when referencing situations in which their children may be participating, such as dating, sex.  Although discovering your child has been engaging in activities that may cause you to want to lock them away for the next 30 years, wouldn’t you rather have a relationship that allows and encourages your child to use you as a sounding board and confidant?   In the blog post “Ben the Person Your Child Confides In,”  Janet Lansbury shares six suggestions for building such a relationship with your child:

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10 Ways to Teach Children to Accept their Mistakes

Posted in General, Guest Mom, Kidtelligent, Mothers Perspective, Web Connections on January 4th, 2013 by kidtelligent@gmail.com – Be the first to comment

parents_with_childNeither of my sons enjoy making mistakes.  Let’s face it, who does?  I see a lot of myself in my sons when they run and hide in their rooms, burying their heads in their pillows or turning beet red upon doing something “incorrectly.”  I have come a long way with accepting my own mistakes, but once in a while I can still get a big blush going after a particularly irritating error.  But, like it or not, making mistakes is an integral part of learning.   In the article “I messed up, Mom & Dad!  10 Ways to Teach Children to Embrace Their Mistakes,”, Dr. Robyn Silverman gives ten pointers on how to teach your children about having a positive mistake-making attitude:

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11 Reasons to Slow Down with Your Child

Posted in General, Guest Mom, Kidtelligent, Mothers Perspective, Web Connections on December 17th, 2012 by kidtelligent@gmail.com – Be the first to comment

coach-swimming“Come on, hurry up!  We’re going to be late!”  I find myself saying these words almost without thinking.  I despise being late, but it seems despite my best efforts, I am always in a race against the clock.  I also have a tendency to over-schedule, and although so far it’s only been for my own activities and responsibilities, and not for my children, I know it affects the whole family.  For these reasons, Dr. Laura Markham’s post “11 Ways Your Child Loses When You Rush Him Through Life” on ahaparenting.com   really struck a chord with me.

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How to Handle Sibling Fights

Posted in General, Guest Mom, Kidtelligent, Mothers Perspective, Web Connections on December 6th, 2012 by kidtelligent@gmail.com – Be the first to comment

David Frost said, “Having one child makes you a parent; having two you are a referee.”  Although this quote may elicit a few understanding chuckles, followed by visions of wearing a striped uniform handing out judgments in the form of red cards or penalty yards, in the world of sibling fights, this does not mean your job is to figure out right from wrong.  As stated by dictionary.com, the definition of “referee” is “one to whom something is referred, especially for decision or settlement; arbitrator.”  In the blog post “How to Intervene in a Sibling Fight” on ahaparenting.com Dr. Laura Markham teaches us some tips about how to best referee sibling fights.

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Goal Setting with Children

Posted in General, Guest Mom, Mothers Perspective, Web Connections on November 30th, 2012 by kidtelligent@gmail.com – Be the first to comment

In today’s age of seemingly endless information, people are constantly bombarded with excessive numbers of choices, decisions, and options.  While overwhelming for an adult, it’s even more easy for children to get sidetracked or to just “go with the flow” instead of actively choosing their life’s path.  Learning how to set goals at an early age gives children the tools they need to live a purposeful life by making decisions, instead of simply reacting to situations.

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An Easier Math Equation: Math-Phobic Parent + Some Great Tips = A Child Who Enjoys Math

Posted in Guest Mom, Kidtelligent, Mothers Perspective, Web Connections on November 19th, 2012 by kidtelligent@gmail.com – Be the first to comment

Perhaps just the sight of your child’s math homework causes you to sweat uncontrollably and your heart to race.  Maybe it conjures up memories of struggling through math tests of your own, or makes you want to hold on to a calculator like a security blanket.  Your reaction may not be this extreme, but many parents today do consider themselves to be “math-phobic.”  However, according to a 2007 study in the journal Developmental Psychology, math skills at a child’s entry into kindergarten is even a stronger predictor of later school achievement than reading skills or even the ability to pay attention.  Additionally, in today’s job market, some of the fastest growing occupations require skills in math or science.  So what’s a math-phobic parent to do in order to help their children with their math skills?   In the article “A Worksheet for Math-Phobic Parents” on the Wall Street Journal online site, Sue Shellenbarger summarizes some great suggestions that will, instead of unconsciously teaching your child to fear math, will help them feel more comfortable and succeed more in math tasks:

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